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rebekah brooks, the former murdoch editor and british c.e.o. who moved in all the right circles. she went to the police station on sunday to answer questions and instead was arrested. brooks is now out on bail and due to testify tomorrow in front of a parliamentary committee along with murdoch himself and his son, james. and in a strange twist to this whole affair, one of the most public whistle-blowers, a man called sean hoare, who was a former entertainment reporter for the "news of the world" was found dead at his home this evening. so far, anyway, police are saying the death is unexplained but not suspicious. bob? >> schieffer: thank you very much, liz. liz palmer in london. in this country, president obama claimed some progress in negotiations to try to find a way to raise the debt limit and keep the government from defaulting on its financial obligations. the reason for the optimism was not all together clear but a cbs news poll out tonight reflects the political toll this crisis is taking. the public is split right down the middle over the president's handling of the situation, but
minister gordon brown's baby just after he was diagnosed with cystic fibrosis. it was rebekah brooks, murdoch's british c.e.o., who called the browns to tell them the story was running, this according to former political aide david muir. >> they didn't know how rebekah came across this information and now that it's come to light it was obtained by what appeared to be an illegal method. >> reporter: as the revelations pile up, a police inquiry has moved into high gear. in 2007, an internal investigation at rupert murdoch's u.k. company is reported to have found clear evidence of illegal activity. but managers didn't take their findings to the police. instead, phone hacking victims who sued were paid to settle out of court. murdoch's son, james, now a director of the new york-based news corporation, authorized one payment for what's said to have been more than a million dollars. >> i acted on the advice of executives and lawyers with incomplete investigation, and that's a matter of real regret for me personally. >> reporter: now that has damaged rupert murdoch's business, he's already
, anthony. anthony mason. the murdochs weren't the only ones who testified today. rebekah brooks was editor of the "news of the world" when the phone hacking first took place. she admitted that mistakes were made but said her company acted properly and quickly. she resigned last week as head of newscorp's british newspapers. back in this country where the clock is now winding down toward a possible government default, the house of representatives spent most of the day debating a republican plan to cut trillions of dollars from the federal budget. there is only one problem-- all sides concede that even if the bill did pass the senate, too-- and that's a long shot-- it faces a certain presidential veto and will never become law. so why do that when time is short? here is congressional correspondent nancy cordes. >> reporter: the house republicans pasted their answer to the debt ceiling crisis without democratic support. >> i'll bet you cash money that it ain't going to become the law. >> reporter: conservatives call the bill cut cap and balance because it cuts spending this year and caps it a
that he had bribed police. so far, rebecca brooks, a former editor turned senior executive, hasn't been investigated, even though she told a parliamentary committee that... >> we have paid the police for information in the past. >> reporter: now public opinion has turned sharply against the paper's owner, rupert murdoch, one of the world's most powerful media tycoons. he bought "the news of the world" back in 1969 and made it the cornerstone of an empire that now includes fox news and the "wall street journal." simon hoggart is a columnist for "the guardian." his newspaper has been investigating the scandal for years, and he says murdoch is facing an enormous backlash. >> it was fear of murdoch before a few days ago, now it's just unalloyed loathing for the guy. >> reporter: the murdochs moved fast to close down "the news of the world" this week, but it's much easier to stop the presses than to repair a reputation tainted by lying and deceit. authorities announced a short time ago that they now arrested a third person in this scandal, a 63-year-old man, although we don't know yet who he
lunch with rebecca brooks. there is a scramble inside the media empire to control toxic fallout from "the news of the world" hacking scandal, which could start making waves in the u.s. >> there's also the issue of did it happen here? "the news of the world" has lots and lots of reporters at any given time on the ground in the u.s. many of its stories, particularly many of its celebrity stories are datelined here. >> reporter: the scandal broke last week with the case of millie dauer. her parents and others discovered that personal voice messages had been hack ed by nes of the journalists hunting for stories. in 2007, a secret internal investigation at murdoch's uk company -- the question now is who knew what when? the ceo of dow jones and publisher of the wall street journal, both owned by murdoch. he may have seen that report. and rupert murdoch's son, james, authorized a reported $1 million payment to one of the hacking victim. >> i acted on the advice of executives and lawyers within complete investigation. and that's a matter of real regret for me, personally. >> reporter: shareh
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5

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